Laser cows, flies alcoholics and other discoveries of the month

Posted by acapulcosilver 10/6/2018 10:54am
Laser Cows, Flies Alcoholics And Other Discoveries Of The Month

Descriptions of many discoveries sound funny, but" Around the world " was able to find them a serious scientific basis.

What's done? Scottish physicists have installed a laser in the cow's eye.

Why was it made? The head of the study swears he has no plans to raise an army of cows shooting laser beams. Installation of eye-safe low-power lasers in contact lenses for people will create new recognition systems that complement the identification of the retina pattern and patterns on the fingertips.

LASER COWS, FLIES ALCOHOLICS AND OTHER DISCOVERIES OF THE MONTH

What's done? Neuroscientists from Germany put Bach's music to crocodiles.

Why was it made? It turned out that the brain of reptiles listening to the Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in the tomograph worked in much the same way as the brain of singing birds. At the same time, the authors proved that MRI scanning is also suitable for reptiles, and this will allow for evolutionary studies of the brain.

LASER COWS, FLIES ALCOHOLICS AND OTHER DISCOVERIES OF THE MONTH

What's done? Economists from England and the USA estimated career growth and salary of ugly people.

Why was it made? After analyzing the income of 20 thousand Americans, scientists have found that repulsive appearance — one of the factors of high earnings, and most of all get frankly ugly workers. As scientists believe, the difference in salary is explained by the fact that unsympathetic people are less open to the new, but persistently improve in the chosen field.

British physicists stretched and tore computer models of fabrics and ropes to understand why clothing does not creep to pieces. Israeli physiologists have proven that sexually satisfied fruit flies are less prone to alcoholism. Danish geneticists have found the inhabitants of Indonesia genetic "devices" for diving.

Photo: GETTY IMAGES (X3)

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